How to Make a Pirate Bandana

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Making a pirate bandana is an effective way to enhance a pirate costume for a masquerade party. It is also a wise way to cover your scalp if you are having a "bad hair day" or to keep sweat out of your eyes while working outdoors. Bandanas are relatively inexpensive and come in a wide range of colors and prints. To make your own bandanna, use a lightweight fabric, particularly 100 percent cotton if you are using it as a sweat band.

Things You'll Need

  • 1/2 yard lightweight fabric
  • Measuring tape
  • Colored marker or pencil
  • Scissors
  • Sewing machine (optional)
  • Fabric glue (optional)
  • Lay your lightweight fabric out on a work surface and smooth it out.

  • Measure a square that is 24 by 24 inches -- the standard size of a bandana.

  • Mark the square with a pencil or colored marker depending on the color of your fabric.

  • Cut out the bandana square.

  • Lay the bandana on your work surface at a diagonal -- with one of the corners facing toward you. Smooth it out with your hands. Position it so the wrong side -- the dull side -- of the fabric is facing up. This allows the right side to be showing once the pirate bandana is complete.

  • Fold over the top corner -- the one facing away from you -- so the tip is near the center of the fabric. Smooth the fold with your fingers.

  • Bend your head forward and place the folded section of the bandana on your forehead approximately 1 or 2 inches above your eyebrows.

  • Tip your head back to allow the bandana fabric to cover your scalp.

  • Tie the corners that are at the side of your head together at the back of your head in a half knot. This leaves you with one corner hanging down the back of your head.

  • Secure the corner that is pointing down by tying the knot over it again.

  • Adjust the bandana so the knotted section is to one side of your head if you want to resemble a particularly jaunty pirate.

Tips & Warnings

  • Finish the edges of your bandana with a sewing machine or fabric glue if you like, but typically the unfinished edge is more appropriate to a mischievous pirate look.
  • Many pirate costumes are red and black; therefore, a print containing these colors works well.

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  • Photo Credit Polka Dot Images/Polka Dot/Getty Images
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