How to Install Lead Roof-Flashing Boots

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The vent pipes appearing along roof surfaces allow hot air to escape from a home’s attic space. And while vent pipes provide ventilation for attic enclosures, damaged or deteriorated pipe materials can quickly become a source for roof leaks. Vent-pipe structures consist of a metal pipe and an outer flashing piece, or pipe boot. Installing a lead flashing boot involves ensuring the roof’s shingles form a tight seal with the vent-pipe flashing.

Things You'll Need

  • Roofing shingles
  • Roofing nails
  • Hammer
  • Lead boot
  • Chalk
  • Utility knife
  • Galvanized nails
  • Roofing sealant
  • Create a shingle pattern that leads to the vent pipe by laying and fastening shingles to the roof. Start at the outside roof edge and work up to the vent pipe area.

  • Slide the lead roof-flashing boot — also known as a lead jack — over the top of the vent pipe to determine how far out the flashing extends across the shingles. Lead jack boots include a flashing piece that extends out from the boot portion and lies across the roof's surface. Make the flashing overlap with the closest row of shingles.

  • Take the lead jack boot off the vent pipe. Lay an additional row of shingles so that the row butts right up against the vent pipe.

  • Place a chalk mark on the shingle that butts up against the vent pipe. Draw an outline of where the vent pipe curves into the shingle.

  • Fit the one shingle around the vent pipe using a utility knife to cut away overlapping shingle material. Ensure the shingle forms a tight fit around the vent pipe.

  • Slide the lead flashing boot onto the vent pipe. Fasten the boot’s flashing to the bottom row of shingles, using galvanized roofing nails.

  • Lay the next row of shingles on top of the top portion of the lead boot’s flashing. Use galvanized nails to fasten the shingles through the boot flashing and to the roof's surface.

  • Place a chalk mark on the shingle that butts up against the top surface of the lead boot. Draw an outline of where the lead boot curves into the shingle.

  • Fit the one shingle around the lead boot, using a utility knife to cut away overlapping shingle material. Ensure the shingle and lead boot form a tight fit.

Tips & Warnings

  • Fold the flaps on the lead boot down into the vent pipe -- to prevent water from seeping in between the boot and the vent pipe.
  • Any gaps or breaks along the shingle's surface can allow water to seep underneath the lead-boot flashing. Apply roof sealant around flashing edges, and also where nails fasten shingles and flashing sections together.

References

  • Photo Credit Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images
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