Specifications for Sugar Cane Molasses

Save

Sugarcane molasses is the liquid product made by evaporating sugarcane juice and removing any crystallized sugar. The Agricultural Marketing Service of the United States Department of Agriculture sets specifications for molasses grades. Sugarcane molasses is made from sugarcane and not from sugar beets. Producers, suppliers, buyers and consumers use standard specifications to distinguish products.

Requirements

  • Sugarcane molasses is graded on minimum Brix solids, minimum total sugar, maximum ash content and maximum total sulfites. Up to 50 points are assigned for color as defined by the USDA permanent glass color standards for sugarcane molasses. A separate rating gives up to 50 points for freedom from defects.

Definitions

  • Brix solids refers to the applicable solids content or Brix value measured by a Brix hydrometer. Ash refers to sulphated ash content. Sulfites refers to parts per million of sulfur dioxide.

Grade A

  • U.S. Grade A, also called U.S. Fancy, has a good flavor and good color. The color is bright and typical of molasses processed from mature, sound sugarcane and meets glass color standard Number 1. Grade A is practically free from defects, which means that any extraneous material does not affect the appearance or edibility. Grade A must have a minimum of 79 percent Brix solids and 63.5 percent total sugar, a maximum of 5 percent ash and maximum 200 parts per million sulfites. To be rated Grade A, sugarcane molasses must rate at least 90 points on the scoring system.

Grade B

  • U.S. Grade B, also called U.S. Choice, has a reasonably good flavor and color that meets glass color standard Number 2. Grade B is reasonably free from defects, meaning that any extraneous material does not affect the appearance or edibility. Grade B must have a minimum of 79 percent Brix solids and 61.5 percent total sugar, a maximum of 7 percent ash and maximum 250 parts per million sulfites. Grade B sugarcane molasses must score at least 80 points.

Grade C

  • U.S. Grade C, also called U.S. Standard, has a fairly good flavor and color that meets glass color standard Number 3. Grade C is fairly free from defects, which means that any extraneous material does not seriously affect the appearance or edibility. Grade C must have a minimum of 79 percent Brix solids and 58 percent total sugar, a maximum of 9 percent ash and maximum 250 parts per million sulfites. To be rated Grade C, sugarcane molasses must score at least 70 points.

Substandard

  • Substandard molasses fails to meet the requirements of U.S. Grade C. Substandard grade has less than 79 percent Brix solids, less than 58 percent total sugar, more than 9 percent ash and more than 250 parts per million sulfites.

References

  • Photo Credit Brand X Pictures/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images
Promoted By Zergnet

Comments

You May Also Like

  • What Is Grade B Maple Syrup?

    Maple syrup's grade is mostly based on color. Rich, dark grade B syrup has more flavor and is a better choice for...

  • Types & Classes of Sugar

    Sugar is a carbohydrate found in all fruits and vegetables. Tapping the sweetness of plants, whether used in their raw state or...

Related Searches

Check It Out

13 Delicious Thanksgiving Sides That'll Make Turkey Insignificant

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!