Freezing Temperature of Lemon Juice

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If you find yourself blessed with an abundance of lemons or simply have one or two laying around that you don't want to go to waste, freeze the juice for later use. Lemon juice is composed mostly of water, which freezes at 32 degrees F. If your lemon juice is pulpy, it might not freeze as solidly and as quickly as water.

Preparation

  • Wash the lemons and remove any stickers that might be left from the grocery store. Cut them in halves and remove seeds visible at the surface. Don't worry about seeds deeper in the fruit; you can remove them from your juice later.

Juicing

  • Press the cut side of the fruit down on to the juice reamer. Twist and squeeze as you press. As the reamer fills, pour the juice through a rice strainer over a large bowl. The strainer will catch excess pulp and seeds that you might not want in your frozen juice.

Measuring

  • Pour lemon juice into clean, dry ice cube trays. If you plan to use lemon juice later for a particular recipe and know the quantity you'll need, measure it ahead of time. For example, if you'll need 4 tablespoons of lemon juice for your favorite lemon bar recipe, measure that into one of the receptacles, mark a line on the outside of the receptacle with a pencil and fill the rest of the receptacles to that line.

Freezing

  • Place the trays in the freezer. After the ice cube trays have frozen solid, you can pour them into a plastic freezer bag or plastic container.

Time Saving Tip

  • Freezing a whole lemon or lemon slices is another way to preserve lemon juice. Put entire lemons directly on the freezer shelf or in a bag; lay lemon slices on a tray and put in the freezer before transferring the slices to a plastic, freezer-safe container. Leave a frozen lemon out on the counter to thaw before extracting juice.

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  • Photo Credit Martin Poole/Digital Vision/Getty Images
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