How to Prevent an Ice Sculpture From Melting at a Wedding Reception

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Wedding receptions are events that make fond, long-lasting memories. The last thing you want is an ice sculptor centerpiece melting or collapsing with the possibility of ruining the entire event. Placing an ice sculpture outside on a warm day or in conditions where heat is high may cause the piece to melt within a few hours. Preventing an ice sculpture from melting at a wedding reception must take precedence in event planning to ensure a memorable day.

  • Use clear ice for wedding ice sculptures; avoid colored options. Clear ice sculptures better reflect natural light, giving off a glowing white (or iridescent) quality that fits with a traditional wedding. Colored ice does not allow light to pass through as easily -- thus absorbing it and expediting the melting process.

  • Situate the ice sculpture in a temperature-controlled room. Maintain a temperature of 70 degrees Fahrenheit or lower for a 300-pound sculpture. A 300-pound sculpture is the standard weight of a two-block sculpture. Avoid positioning the sculpture outdoors in direct sunlight -- especially during warm and balmy months.

  • Place the sculpture in a part of the room where temperatures are coolest. Keep the sculpture in the shade and away from windows -- or the intense heat of stage lights. Position the sculpture near a functioning central air conditioner vent or a portable cooling device for added chill.

  • Make the sculpture bigger and thicker by using more ice to increase the overall weight. While a 300-pound sculpture has an average life span of six hours in a temperature controlled room, increasing the weight will extend the life of the object -- especially if it must sit out for an extended period of time prior to the arrival of wedding party members and guests.

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