How to Make an Indian Corn Door Swag

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Ablaze in the colors of the season, Indian corn sets the tone for autumn. This decorating staple serves as a colorful door swag that children can help create. A small grouping such as three ears of corn creates a simply stated swag; using seven or more ears may prove a bit unwieldy and difficult to hang. Be sure the Indian corn you use is free from insects or large areas of missing kernels before purchasing it.

Things You'll Need

  • 3 or more ears of dried Indian corn, husks attached
  • Raffia
  • Scissors
  • Decorative ribbon in autumn or jewel tones
  • Brush off any stray dirt or debris on each ear of corn by hand. Position the husks so the husks point upward and the corn faces downward to make it easier to tie the corn ears together.

  • Tie a small knot around each husk near the point where it meets its respective ear of corn with a small piece of raffia. Use one piece of raffia for each ear and tie the knots tightly so the raffia loop does not slide if pulled.

  • Run a strand of raffia through each small knotted raffia loop to connect each ear of corn to one main raffia strand. Cut the long raffia piece with scissors so it is 2 to 3 feet long, providing enough length to hang the swag.

  • Hold both ends of the long raffia strand up so the ears of corn group together in the center. Tie the raffia strand in a knot at the back of the corn so it hangs at the desired length from a nail or hook on the door. To mask the raffia completely, pull the ends tightly around the nail or hook during the first portion of the knotting process so the swag hangs near the hook.

  • Tie a piece of decorative ribbon around the corn swag, over the area where the ears and husks meet. Use jewel tones such as purple or red for a play on color against the corn, or autumn tones for a swag celebrating the season.

Tips & Warnings

  • Select husks of Indian corn in an assortment of colors and sizes to add variety to the swag.
  • Test the strength of the husk by lifting individual ears of corn up by its husk; choose only the ears that do not become easily separated from the husks.
  • Squirrels may be tempted to eat the corn off your swag if they're plentiful in your area. Avoid spraying paint or chemicals on the corn to keep it safe for the neighborhood critters.

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References

  • Photo Credit aimy27feb/iStock/Getty Images
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