How to Make Spaghetti Roll on a Fork

How to Make Spaghetti Roll on a Fork thumbnail
Forks are used much differently for spaghetti than for many other dishes.

If you're attending a formal Italian dinner and aren't familiar with pasta etiquette, tackling a plate of spaghetti armed only with a fork can be a daunting task. You don't want to make a mess of yourself, and you don't want to act like a child by cutting up your noodles with a knife and spooning them into your mouth. Long-standing Italian dining etiquette dictates that you use a fork to twirl your spaghetti into a compact package, making the noodles easier to eat with less mess or room for embarrassment.

Instructions

    • 1

      Hold the fork in your dominant hand, keeping the fork vertical so that the tines are down in the dish of spaghetti.

    • 2

      Slide the tines of the fork to the side of the dish and ensure that they are tucked into a bunch of noodles.

    • 3

      Spin the fork in a clockwise direction, using your fingers to twirl the fork's handle around in several circles.

    • 4

      Lift the fork from the plate and gauge the amount of pasta on the end of the fork. Place the noodles back on your dish and repeat the process if you have picked up too many noodles to fit into your mouth in one bite.

Tips & Warnings

  • Avoid using a spoon or a knife when eating spaghetti.

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  • Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

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