How to Grout With Sandless Grout


Grout is used to fill in the joints between tiles on the wall and floor. It can help prevent damage to the edges on tiles, keep dirt from building up in the crevices and provide a decorative accent to the tile color. Grout is manufactured in two primary varieties: sanded, which has larger particles to fill in wider joints, particularly on the floor, and unsanded or sandless, which is a smoother, finer grout suitable for wall and countertop installations, jobs with a grout line 1/8 inch or smaller or fragile glass or natural stone tiles that might be damaged by the sanded grout scraping the surface of the tile.

Things You'll Need

  • Grout float
  • Scrubbing sponge
  • Grout sealer
  • Blend the powdered grout per the manufacturer's instructions. The ideal consistency for a good grout job is similar to smooth peanut butter. Allow the grout to sit for 10 minutes before using.

  • Scoop up a small amount of grout with your grout float. Test the consistency and ensure that it is both solid enough to stay in the joint and wet enough to spread easily.

  • Press the grout into the joints by sweeping your float diagonal to the grout lines you are currently filling in. Hold the float at a 45 degree angle to the tile to pack the most grout possible into the lines.

  • Continue filling in the grout lines across your project area. Remove as much excess grout from the face of the tile as you can while you are working.

  • Rinse the surface of the tile with a sponge dampened in clean water to remove any large particles of grout still remaining. Wait 15 minutes for a haze to form on the surface, then repeat the process, using clean water and rinsing the sponge well each time, until haze no longer forms on the tile.

  • Apply a grout and tile sealer after waiting for the grout to dry per the manufacturer's instructions. This will prevent anything that might be spilled on the tile from soaking in and staining the grout.


  • Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images
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