How to Prune a Hibiscus Plant

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Pruning a hibiscus plant involves cutting off the dead blooms, trimming out any dead foliage and removing the suckers that grow from the bottom. Keep a hibiscus plant pruned to encourage more healthy growth with helpful information from a sustainable gardener in this free video on growing plants.

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Hi this is Yolanda Vanveen and in this segment I want to talk about how to prune a hibiscus plant. Now hibiscus are a beautiful beautiful addition to your garden so there's different types of hibiscus and they all come from tropical areas so most varieties don't like to freeze but this variety right here is a hardy hibiscus that at least in the Northwest I can leave it outside. Now the sunset varieties that have the huge tropical flowers that you see in Hawaii a lot of times those will not Winter over in colder climates so you have got to bring them inside as soon as it gets below 50 degrees but hibiscus are really easy to grow and they're easy to prune and there is a few rules that you should follow. So as long as the foliage looks okay then you don't really need to mess with your hibiscus but you'll notice as they get done blooming that if you just cut out the dead blooms, I actually like to cut the greenery down too to the, you don't want to cut the stems but you just cut the blooms right out and just by trimming out some of the dead leaves they'll do really well and a lot of times the suckers come out the bottom and kind of go off the sides, those are always really nice to cut out too and by just trimming it out what happens is that you encourage more growth on the other stems and the blooms will do much better and you never want to prune out more than one third of the plant at one time so you can trim it down one third but not more than that. You can always wait a month and go back and hack it back again and the best time to prune your hibiscus is in the early Spring before they grow again. So I keep cutting them out periodically and in the Fall it will lose its leaves and it will go completely dormant, I'll just have some stems and then in the Spring I want to trim those back and any new suckers you want to trim those back and it will come back really lush again and hibiscus are great too because even, as long as you don't trim it all the way to the ground and even then a lot of time it will shoot roots, they love to be trimmed and it will just encourage more growth and you always want to cut to another leaf line and you don't want to hack it all the way so less is more in a way. You don't want to cut it back too much but if the flowers are looking bad and the foliage is looking bad it is great to cut them back because it seems the more you cut back your hibiscus the more they grow and they fill out and you get more blooms for the next year.

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