How to Make Cuttings From a Redbud Tree

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Redbud trees provide beautiful colors in spring and fall.
Redbud trees provide beautiful colors in spring and fall. (Image: smoky mountains, meadow, and fresh spring bud on tree limbs image by Jorge Moro from Fotolia.com)

Redbud trees are great for the environment, add color to the landscape and make a great addition to any yard. If you enjoy landscaping, gardening and growing your own plants, you don't always have to begin with seedlings purchased from the store. Take a cutting or clipping from an existing redbud tree and you'll soon have another thriving seedling to keep or share.

Things You'll Need

  • Garden knife or scissors
  • Newspaper
  • Root-promoting chemical
  • Peat moss
  • Pot
  • Spray bottle

Start 8 to 10 inches from the tip of the redbud shoot. Clip the section on an angle, using your garden knife or scissors.

A healthy tree shoot in the summer.
A healthy tree shoot in the summer. (Image: jeunepousse image by Buffalo street from Fotolia.com)

Peel away the redbud shoot's bark on two sides, using the edge of the scissors or garden knife. This exposes the cambium, which is the layer beneath the bark. Exposing the cambium will make it easier for the roots to break through as they grow.

A garden knife comes in handy when taking cuttings.
A garden knife comes in handy when taking cuttings. (Image: knife image by apeschi from Fotolia.com)

Spread newspaper on your work surface to keep it free from dirt.

Dip the cut end of the redbud cutting in the root-promoting chemical. A powdered form works best but liquid will do, if needed.

Your cutting will produce a beautiful tree.
Your cutting will produce a beautiful tree. (Image: redbud branch image by Carbonbrain from Fotolia.com)

Place the redbud clipping in a sturdy pot filled one-third of the way with peat moss. Fill the rest of the pot with soil and pat it down gently.

Fill a spray bottle with water and use it to mist the cutting. Water the peat moss, as well. Keep the cutting in a moist, well-drained pot. Allow your plant two to three weeks to root before removing it from the peat moss to check its progress.

A new root system forms beneath the peat moss.
A new root system forms beneath the peat moss. (Image: baby plant with root system image by joanna wnuk from Fotolia.com)

Tips & Warnings

  • Collect your cutting in the fall or early winter when the tree has gone dormant.
  • Refrain from placing your redbud cutting in direct sunlight.

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