How to Fertilize Zoysia Grass

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Zoysia grass is used on many golf courses.
Zoysia grass is used on many golf courses. (Image: Golf cart on golf course image by Jim Mills from Fotolia.com)

Zoysia grass is a native grass to China, Japan, and Southeast Asia. Zoysia grass makes a beautiful lawn. Two varieties of zoysia exist: Meyer and Emerald. Although this grass is slow growing, it is a wonderful grass for lawns, golf courses, baseball fields and fairways. It does need an occasional dose of fertilizer to keep it healthy and growing, but it only needs fertilizing twice a year. Over-fertilizing your zoysia grass could result in lawn disease, insect infestation, thatch and weak roots.

Things You'll Need

  • Slow-release high-nitrogen fertilizer
  • Fertilizer spreader or broadcast spreader

Choose a slow-release, high nitrogen fertilizer that will provide 1 pound of nitrogen to 1,000 square feet of grass area. Read the fertilizer label to make sure it is for zoysia grass. Nitrogen is the first listed number and the next number is phosphorous, followed by potassium.

Buy a fertilizer spreader or a broadcast spreader. You can find them at most garden supply stores or you can borrow one. Calibrate it to dispense the correct amount of fertilizer for your lawn.

Fill the chamber with fertilizer. Open the fertilizer once you are at a fast pace. Push the fertilizer spreader at a quick pace over your lawn, but do not run. Go back and forth in rows giving your lawn an even coverage. Cover the area only once with the fertilizer. When you need to slow down for a corner or to turn around, shut off the spreader. If you don’t, you will burn your lawn by using too much fertilizer.

Apply a second application of fertilizer eight weeks later. Do not fertilize the zoysia grass after mid-September.

Tips & Warnings

  • Fertilize late in the spring or early summer when the zoysia grass is 50 percent green. Do not do this any earlier than May.

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