How to Rescreen a Porch

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The porch has always been a meeting place for new guests and family and friends ever since its conception hundreds of years ago. Porches give us a threshold between the great outdoors and domesticated living in a few feet of space and many people enjoy a quiet time simply by sitting on their porch and relaxing in the fresh air. Screened porches have given us the ability to enjoy the outdoors without having to deal with pesky bugs and offers a bit more security from wild animals. Over time these screened porches need repair because of tears and weathering, and with a few simple instructions anybody can re-screen his own porch.

Things You'll Need

  • Mesh screening material
  • Rubber spline material
  • Splining tool
  • Knife
  • Tacks

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Remove all of the damaged screen. If the screen isn't damaged in certain areas, you may keep it in place depending on how the porch is designed (applicable with independently screened sections), but it would be wise to replace the entire screen at one time to keep from having to do it later.

Measure the area you wish to apply the new screen, then cut and position the screen over the spline groove, allowing at least 1/2 inch of mesh overhang past the groove. Tack the screen into place in this position using thumb tacks or small nails.

Apply the rubber spline by pushing it into the groove over the mesh at the starting corner by hand and work it up just an inch. Use the splining tool to roll the rubber spline into place the rest of the way. After you've applied the starting vertical spline, work from left to right or vice versa as you apply the rubber spline horizontally and stretch the screen taut.

Continue to install the rubber spline until all grooves have been splined securely. Ensure that you stretch the screen as you spline the rubber into the grooves. You may need to have a friend or family member help with this step.

Cut the excess screen material from around the edges of the spline groove. Use an Exact-o knife or box cutter for this step and cut the material as close to the rubber spline as possible. The excess screen should be barely visible next to the spline.

References

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