How to Clean a Toro 826LE Carburetor

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The Toro 826LE snow blower uses a standard four-stroke Toro engine, which uses a carburetor instead of a throttle body to deliver fuel and air to the engine. At the beginning of every season, cleaning the carburetor to ensure the engine runs properly is a good idea. A snow blower runs during very cold weather, and ensuring the carburetor delivers the appropriate amount of gas and air to the engine is important. Unless you are adept at rebuilding carburetors, take steps to clean the carburetor without fully dismantling it. This way, you do not have to adjust the jetting needles and the float.

Things You'll Need

  • Screwdriver
  • Wrench set
  • Rags
  • Carburetor cleaner

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Locate the air cleaner on the opposite side of the engine from the muffler. The air cleaner is inside a black plastic box. Remove the screws that hold the air cleaner cover in place and then pull out the air cleaner.

Remove the bolts that hold the housing over the carburetor and then pull off the housing.

Place several shop towels under the carburetor on the engine. Carburetor cleaner will not damage the engine but using shop towels will prevent getting the cleaner onto any painted surfaces.

Spray the outside of the carburetor with the carburetor cleaner. This includes the throttle cable linkage on the side of the carburetor. Keep spraying until you flush away all of the dirt on the outside of the carburetor. Wipe the surface of the carburetor clean with a shop rag.

Locate the float bowel on the bottom of the carburetor. On the bottom of the float bowel you will see a drainage bolt. Remove the drainage bolt with a wrench and drain the gas in the float bowel into a glass container. Remove the four screws that hold the float bowel in place and then place the float bowel off to the side. When you remove the float bowel, the float will drop into a downward position. Do not remove the float or the needle held in place by the float.

Locate all of the round passageways inside the carburetor. Spray the needle above the float. Keep spraying until the cleaner comes off clean and not black. Wipe off the surfaces inside the carburetor with a shop towel. Complete a visual inspection to make sure you do not leave any lint from the shop towel in the carburetor.

Clean the inside of the float bowel with the carburetor cleaner and then tighten the drain bolt into place.

Push the float back up into the carburetor and you place the float bowel onto the bottom of the carburetor. Secure the carburetor with the four screws.

Place the air cleaner housing back over the carburetor and secure it with the bolts. Place a new air cleaner into the housing and then place the housing cover over the air cleaner and secure it with the screws.

References

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