Homemade Static Guard

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Static cling gets irritating, especially in winter months. Clothes cling to bodies, and kids love running over the carpet just to attempt their parents' electrocution-by-finger. Static Guard spray made by Alberto-Culver reduces static cling when sprayed on clothing or carpet, but home remedies to reduce static work well when you're between cans.

Laundry

  • When clothes are in the dryer, they rub together in much the same way a child rubs his feet on the carpet to create static electricity. Once they come out of the dryer, the buildup of static electricity causes them to cling to the body. In the washer, adding liquid fabric softener during the rinse cycle helps prevent static in clothing. Use dryer sheets in the dryer to reduce static further.

    After drying your clothes with a dryer sheet, save the used sheet to place in a drawer to help freshen clothes. Rub a dryer sheet on clothes before getting dressed to help reduce the static throughout the day, and retain a used dryer sheet to rub on your clothes if the static builds up again and the clothing starts to cling. When you are out of dryer sheets, rub a metal clothes hanger over the garment to reduce the static.

Personal Static

  • Use lotion on your body before dressing if your skin is dry. The moisture in the lotion diffuses the static charge and reduces the static that can build up from pulling on slacks or pantyhose.

    Use hair products that condition and moisturize your hair. Very dry hair tends to fly and drift from static electricity. Blow dry your hair with an ionic dryer that takes out the static and conditions the hair. If your hair starts to suffer from static electricity during the day, use a small amount of hair spray or rub a dab of lotion on your hands and pull through the ends of your hair to calm it down.

Home Static

  • At home, reduce your static charges by keeping the air from getting too dry. Warm, dry climates can encourage static electricity as can cold climates when furnaces run and dry the air. Purchase a few houseplants and keep them watered to help humidify the air. Consider a humidifier or vaporizer in very dry homes.

References

  • Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images
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