Changing a Website's Resolution

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A website's resolution determines its size on different computer screens. Websites that are viewed in a lower screen resolution appear larger, while those viewed in a higher resolution appear smaller, making it easier to fit more information on the computer screen. Selecting the preferred website width is difficult because each user’s screen setting is different. According to W3schools.com, the trend (as of January 2009) for most computers is a screen resolution of 1024X760 pixels or more.

Checking Your Screen’s Resolution

  • Computer screen resolutions include 640 X 480 pixels (low resolution), 800 x 600 pixels, 1024 x 768 pixels, 1280 X 1024 pixels, 1400 X 1050 pixels, 1680 X 1050 pixels, 1440 X 900 pixels and 1600 X 1200 pixels.

    You can check the screen resolution for a website you are viewing. To check it in Windows, right-click on the Desktop and select \"Properties.\" You will find the screen resolution that is set for your computer under the \"Settings\" tab. To check screen resolution on a Mac, click on the “Apple” button and choose \"System Preferences.\" Click on the \"Displays\" icon and select a resolution from the drop-down list under the \"Display tab. You can also check your screen resolution online by going to http://www.whatismyscreenresolution.com.

Testing Your Screen's Resolution

  • To test how your website looks in different resolutions, return to your computer settings and increase or decrease the screen resolution on the slider or drop-down list. Click “Apply” and check out the website.

Making Changes to the Website’s Resolution

  • Some websites are designed automatically to expand or contract on your computer screen no matter what screen resolution you use.

    A website's table width affects resolution. Its width is relative to the screen resolution when set to a percentage, and it appears the same on all monitor screens. A web designer may use width percentages for the website, so it can appeal to a wider audience.

    An example of the code using table width percentage in hypertext markup language (HTML) would be:

    <table width=\"100%\">
    <tr>
    <td>---Some Content Here---</td>
    </tr>
    </table>

    An example of the code using cascading style sheets (CSS) would be:

    content {

    width: 100%
    GO
    margin: auto
    GO
    }

    On the other hand, some websites are created with a fixed (absolute) width, which makes them look smaller or larger on different screen resolutions. Web designers use fixed widths to keep their designs intact.

    An example of a fixed width code (in HTML tables) would be:

    <table width=”799”>
    <tr>
    <td>---Some Content Here---</td>
    </tr>
    </table>

    An example of the code using CSS would be:

    content {

    width: 799px
    GO
    margin: auto
    GO
    }

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