Diet for Gouty Arthritis

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Gout is caused by excessive amounts of uric acid in the tissues and the blood. As it begins to accumulate, it crystallizes and lodges in the joints of the body, causing the symptoms of arthritis. It likes the joints farthest from the heart, because they tend to be cooler than joints that are closest to the trunk of the body. Uric acid is the end product of the breakdown of purines. Rich, fatty foods are known to be a major cause of gout conditions because of their excessive amounts of uric acid-producing components.

Raw Foods

  • Eat more raw fruits and vegetables. They are higher in nutrients than processed foods, and these nutrients are more easily assimilated by the body. Fruits and vegetables that are high in vitamins B, C and E should be eaten regularly. Fresh fruit juices are also good diet additions. Cherry juice neutralizes uric acid. Blueberries and strawberries may also have the same neutralizing effects.

Avoid Purines

  • Avoid foods that have high levels of purines. These include asparagus, anchovies, mackerel, mushrooms, brewer's yeast, peanuts and sardines. When purines are digested and broken down by the body, one of the byproducts is uric acid. While some meats may not have high levels of purines, they do contain high levels of uric acid, so they should be avoided or eaten in moderation.

Fried/Fatty Foods

  • Avoid foods that are deep fried in oil or cooked in animal fats and butter. Try using olive oil or safflower oil as alternatives. Some fat is essential to the diet, but don't overuse it.

Refined/Processed Foods

  • Avoid refined and processed foods, such as white flour and sugar. They are mostly devoid of nutrients and can cause acid levels in the body to rise. This in turn, would cause an increase in uric acid levels and the way the body handles their elimination.

References

  • Prescription for Nutritional Healing; Phyllis Balch; 2006
  • Goutcure.com
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