Tips on Buying Golf Cart Batteries

Save

As an electric vehicle, a golf cart is completely dependent on its battery in order to function. This makes the selection of the right battery extremely important. Overpowering is a waste of money, while underpowering might cause your cart to run out of juice a few holes sooner than you anticipated. Here are some ways to narrow down your choices to find the right brand, in the right price range, and with the right specs.

Brand

  • Pay close attention to the brand when buying your golf cart batteries--some are better than others. Think about where you live--some brands fare better in the cold, others are better in the heat. Consider if your golf cart will have to endure significant winter off-season. Golf cart batteries are usually sold under different local brands, but two of the best overall nationwide are Trojan and US Battery--they are of comparable quality and cost. A cheaper option is Exide, but these tend to wear out just a bit faster.

Price range

  • The low end of the price range on golf cart batteries is typically around $75. These tend to be a 6V local brand, good for smaller carts and and not built to last. You can also find batteries for up to $300-$400. They are worth the price for heavier carts that need the power, often V8s made to outlast the warranty most of them come with. The heavier your golf cart, the more power you need and the more money you will have to pay. It is usually worth it to get a battery with a warranty, or buy the warranty separately, to guard against factory defect. If you intend to install more than one battery, many outlets will package a number together at reduced prices.

Specs

  • Before spending money, be sure to know the major specifications for the battery you need. Dimensions are important, especially if you have a particularly small cart or battery case--be sure a battery can fit in your cart before you buy. Pay attention to the number of hours a cart can go, and at which ampere load. Batteries will last longer at low outputs--low speed--than they will at high speed. If you drive fast, you'll need a battery that will last at a high ampere load. If you drive slower, you might be OK with a cheaper battery that has a long life only at low ampere loads.

Promoted By Zergnet

Comments

Resources

You May Also Like

Related Searches

Check It Out

10 Delicious Game Day Eats That Rival the Game

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!