Planting Indoors: Growing an Herb Garden

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Planting Indoors: Growing an Herb Garden....5

Growing an herb garden indoors keeps herbs protected from harsh climates and pests. Build and harvest an indoor garden of your own with help from a professional gardener in this free video.

Part of the Video Series: Vegetable & Fruit Gardening
Promoted By Zergnet

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Video Transcript

Hello, my name is Brant, I'm a lifelong garden enthusiast, organic advocate. I'm going to demonstrate how to plant a indoor herb garden that you can keep in a sunny location in your house. In an atrium, in a sunny breakfast nook, or even on a patio. The herbs I've chosen are perennial herbs. They are going to be all year long. They'll provide a constant source of fresh herbs for your cooking. They'll be aromatic in your living space and it will look nice. So, here we go. At first, I'm going to fill the pot up with potting soil. I like to use this nice organic blend. No chemicals in here. You are going to be eating these herbs so you don't want to be eating any chemicals. Okay, spread the soil out. Make sure you got about the right amount. Then, I like to add a couple amendments to it. I like to add worm castings. A couple of handfuls for a bowl this size. And then some organic fertilizer. This is a time-released fertilizer. It will feed these plants for up to three to four months. Sprinkle a couple of handfuls in here and then mix it all in. Once I prepare the soil, I like to take the herbs and sort of space them around. I want to see how they are going to look when I'm done. Make sure that they are not too packed or too, or too much space between them. I like to put things that will grow tall, the parsley, the sage, the rosemary, keep them separated from each other a little bit. In the center of the pot give them room to grow up. Then herbs like oregano and thyme I like to put near the edges. This keeps them out of the way of the larger plants. It allows them to grow, to spill over the side of the pot. And it gives them more of a growing area. You'll have a more productive herb, I mean thyme and oregano plant if they are allowed to get out of the way of the other taller plants. So now that I have them situated, comes the fun part. We put them in. Take the pot, gently take the plant out of the pot. Loosen the soil and the roots up a little bit. Dig down and just place them in there. Push the soil down around the plant to sort up firmly get it in place. Move the soil and then move on to the next one. This is the thyme plant. It's going to be a great, it'll get a pretty nice big ball. It has flowers on it, pink flowers in the spring. It will look great. Sage plant, same thing this will grow to be tall it will have a nice blue flower in the spring. Very pretty. Oregano. This is a great one. These do fantastic in containers. Place them down in there. Pack the soil around. Spritz them up a little bit. And then the last guy the rosemary. This one is going to get really big. Someday this plant will be out in your garden. It will be so big that it will overwhelm this pot. So keep it pruned, keep pinching off. Keep using your rosemary. Use it to season meats, vegetables, roasted potatoes. Fantastic in those kind of dishes. After planting the last step is to water it in. Now once you've watered your container garden and you keep it in a sunny location. If it's going to be indoors you are not going to be watering it very much. Potentially once or twice a week. I'm Brant and this has been how I plant an indoor herb garden.

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