How Do I Replace Bathtub Faucet Washers?

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The washers on your bathtub faucet wear out as years pass, and must be replaced to keep water flow normal. Keep your washers up to date with help from a professionally licensed contractor in this free video.

Part of the Video Series: Plumbing Advice: Bathroom & Kitchen
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Video Transcript

Hi, my name is Chris Wade, and I'm a contractor in the city of Los Angeles. Today, I'm going to show you how to replace some washers in a bathtub faucet. Okay, first thing we need to do in order to get to that washer you need to pull the cover off. And again always turn your water off at the main, if you don't you are going get water all over you and it's not very comical. Undo the screw. Pull it out. Pull out your handle. And then you want to pull off the extension ring which has an endless amount of threads and will seem like it takes forever to unscrew. Pull that off. Set it to the side. And then you are going to want to take your wrench and turn it and undo this set nut that's right here. And then you are going to want to take your plumber's pliers and just gently pull this out. Once you pull it out you'll see that there's a rubber O ring right here and then there's a washer just behind this, this screw right here. You want to inspect them both and you want to make sure that they're not corroded or anything. But if you do need to replace them what this basically just slides off. And you set that to the side. Now the easiest way to get this off because it is kind of small, you can hold it in your hand and try to turn. But you are almost going to be fighting it because this thing actually turns the valve handle right here. So, go ahead and just slip it back in your handle and that way you can get a good grip on it. Just turn that, undo the screw. Remove the old washer. Replace the new washer. Put the screw back in. Tighten it down, don't over tighten it just make it snug. Pull it off the handle. Once you replace the O ring, get it on nice and tight. You just want to stick it back in and just put the whole thing back in the reverse order you took it out. Go outside turn your water back on. Come back check for leaks or drips and if you don't have anything then you just saved yourself several hundred dollars from having to call a plumber. That's about it.

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