How to Train a Horse to Stop Bucking

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Training a horse to stop bucking requires completing progressive exercises in the round pen using lunge lines and a saddle before ever riding him. Help a horse adjust to the idea of being ridden with tips from a professional horse trainer in this free video on training horses.

Part of the Video Series: Horse Training
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Video Transcript

Hi, I'm Pete Lichau. I'm head trainer at Rose Gate Farm, and I'd like to talk to you today about how to stop your horse from bucking. The materials needed for this video are: a round pen, a Western saddle, ten foot of half-inch cotton rope, a twenty foot lunge line. First thing we'll do, we'll take our horse in the round pen and we'll lunge him, just to warm up. Once your horse is warmed up and calm and easy, we'll put the saddle on for the first time. Take plenty of time to do that. Again, not to upset your animal. The next thing, we'll want to walk alongside of our horse gently, with a lead rope, as he carries that saddle for the first time. After your horse is relaxed, we'll hook him up to his lunge line and we'll start to lunge our horse again. Again, just to warm up and to relax him. Once we've lunged both directions, and he's comfortable with that, we'll take another lunge line and attach it to horn of our Western saddle. As we're lunging again, we'll apply some lateral pressure to that horn by gentling tugging and releasing. When our horse is comfortable with that, we'll take the lunge lines off of the saddle, we'll attach one to the inside of the halter and the other to outside of the halter. The lunge line that's attached to the outside of the halter will run behind the horse's rear end, and we'll start to lunge again, applying gentle pressure with that back lunge line. Once we've lunged our horse adequately--both directions--using gentle pressure with that back lunge line to turn around and change directions, by using gentle pressure with both lunge lines to help him stop. Once he feels comfortable with these actions, he's ready for the next phase of his education, which is to go ahead and ride. Now, when doing these steps, make sure that you allow plenty of time for the horse to understand these different aspects. Practice them over and over, maybe a month. Once they are completely relaxed with each part of these, the chances of him becoming upset when you ride will be greatly lessened. I hope this helps you and keeps you safe. I'm Pete Lichau with Rose Gate Farm. Glad I could help.

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