Where Does Bacteria Live?

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Bacteria lives everywhere including surfaces, inside of the body and inside of other bugs and animals. Find out how important bacteria is for digestion and decomposition with information from a science teacher in this free video on bacteria.

Part of the Video Series: Animal Habitats
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What can cause your eye to be red and itchy, and also turn milk in to yogurt? The answer is bacteria. I'm Janice Creneti, and I've been teaching environmental science for over twenty years. I'm here today to answer the question "Where do bacteria live?" Well, it's a pretty short answer, and the answer is 'everywhere'. Bacteria are found on the surface of this table, in the corner of my eye, inside my mouth, and even growing inside my intestines. Bacteria are found inside water, and they also grow inside the bodies of things like termites. They actually have a bacteria which helps them digest wood. Now we're mostly familiar with bacteria in terms of the bad things that it does, the diseases that it causes, the infections. Staph infections are a very serious problem that we're having nowadays, and doctors are having a hard time fighting. But bacteria are also very important for our ecosystem, and very important for human health. As I mentioned, they're necessary for turning milk in to yogurt. They're necessary for helping milk turn in to cheese. And they're also necessary for helping our bodies digest. But bacteria have another very important job in our ecosystem. They are the primary decomposers in water. So when a fish dies, or a crab dies, where does it go? Well, it has to be broken down or the water would be polluted, and it's the job of bacteria to do that decomposing. Bacteria are found everywhere, but they're most likely to grow in areas that are warm and moist. So when you're trying to control the growth of bacteria, what you want to do is make sure that any area that's infected you keep it clean and dry, then bacteria won't have as much of a chance to grow. I'm Janice Creneti, and this is "Where do bacteria live?"

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