Black Bear Scat & Tracking Black Bears

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The facts of bear tracking! Learn how to recognize black bear scat and what you can infer from it to help track black bear in this free video on bear tracking.

Part of the Video Series: How to Track a Black Bear
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Video Transcript

We are Nick and Valerie Wisniewski on behalf of expertvillage.com. We would like to talk about bear sign and for more information, you can get to our website walnuthilltracking.com. In front of us here, we have two black bear scats and the bear has a very highly variable diet so scat is going to also be very highly variable. In the spring they are going to be eating succulent vegetation. In the summer they are going to be eating a lot of berries. In the fall like now, they are going to be eating a lot of nuts and acorns. This particular scat of this bear is full of beechnut. You can see the husks in there and the material all beechnut. They love beechnut, they seek them out and they will feed in beechnut trees until the nuts are gone. When we are looking at an animal scat, we use a caliper. Some calipers have dials. This one is a simple sliding caliper and we use that to measure the diameter of an animals scat and the diameter is really crucial in determining what kind of animal you have. This particular scat is about an inch and half in diameter which would make it an average size female. Black bear scat is anywhere from an inch and quarter in diameter for adults up to two inches and even over. Some scats for black bears have been measured at 2 ¾ inch in diameter. That would be very unusual. Next is we also have another beechnut scat. This one survived a heavy rain. We had some torrential downpours and so the tubalarity of the scat has disappeared and all that is left basically is a large plot. It would have been in a tubular shape when it was first extruded.

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