What Happens to the Portion of the Cell Membrane That Surrounds a Large Molecule During Endocytosis?

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In the first step of endocytosis, proteins begin to form a vesicle so that we can bring molecules into the cell. Find out what happens to the portion of the cell membrane used during endocytosis with help from an experienced science professional in this free video clip.

Part of the Video Series: The Marvels of Cells & DNA
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Video Transcript

Hi, I'm Michael Maidaa, and this is what happens to the portion of the cell membrane used during endocytosis. First we need to understand exactly what's going on in endocytosis. So here we have a portion of the cell membrane. In the first step of endocytosis, proteins begin to form a vesicle so that we can bring molecules into the cell. The proteins are contained on the portion of the plasma membrane that's being used to form the vesicle. In the next step, the vesicle has been completely made and closed off with all the molecules that we need inside the cell. This vesicle is now free to move inside the cell where it can release the molecules and break apart leaving all the membrane proteins free to be recycled. These membrane proteins through a variety of methods can then be recycled and returned to the plasma membrane where they can be used again. Also, another method is having this vesicle be completely reused for exocytosis where molecules are taken out of the cell. So to recap, we have a portion of the cell membrane. It then is pulled apart by proteins to make a vesicle. The vesicle can then bring molecules into the cell. Once the molecules are in the cell, the vesicle can break apart and then all the pieces can be recycled and returned to the plasma membrane for use again. I'm Michael Maidaa and this is what happens to the portion of the cell membrane after endocytosis.

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