What Are the Coils of DNA in the Nucleus?

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The coils of DNA are actually called chromosomes, and they’re made up of long stretches of DNA that are tightly packed together. Find out what the coils of DNA in the nucleus are with help from an experienced science professional in this free video clip.

Part of the Video Series: The Marvels of Cells & DNA
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Video Transcript

Hi, I’m Michael Maidaa, and this is, “What Are the Coils of DNA in the nucleus?” Well, the coils of DNA are actually called chromosomes, and they’re made up of long stretches of DNA that are tightly packed together. This way, the DNA is very compact and fits in the nucleus. So, in the compaction process, to make the tight coils we start out with the DNA. This DNA then wraps itself around a bunch of proteins called histones to form beads on a string. From then, these beads begin to tightly coil up with each other, making a thick fiber. This fiber can then keep getting thicker and thicker until it eventually forms into the shape of a chromosome, which are tight coils of DNA. So, in this process, we’ve gone from a thin stretch of DNA all the way to a tightly compacted chromosome. I’m Michael Maidaa, and this has been, “What Are the Coils of DNA in the nucleus?”

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