How Diffusion Occurs Across the Plasma Membrane

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The plasma membrane is made up of phospholipid bi-layer. Find out how diffusion occurs across the plasma membrane with help from an experienced science professional in this free video clip.

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Hi, I'm Michael Maidaa and this is how diffusion occurs across the plasma membrane. The plasma membrane is made up of phospholipid bi-layer. So, here we have the bi-layer. On the outer part of the membrane are the polar heads of the bi-layer. And then on the inside we have the non-polar tails. Due to how this is setup, it's a semi-permeable membrane, meaning only some molecules can simply diffuse through. Example of these molecules are molecules that are soluble in lipids. Also, there are several gases and water that can dissolve through. So, for here we could have an oxygen molecule for example. Because of its small size, it can easily make its way and diffuse through the membrane. Also, if we have a lipid molecule. A lipid molecule is the same substance as the inside of the membrane. For that reason it is also able to diffuse straight through. Other molecules however such as complex proteins and bigger molecules are not able to simply diffuse through the membrane. I'm Michael Maidaa and this has been how diffusion occurs across the plasma membrane.

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