Water & Solute Movement Through Cell Membranes

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A cell membrane is semi-permeable, which means only some molecules can possibly diffuse through it. Find out about water and solute movement through a cell with help from an experienced science professional in this free video clip.

Part of the Video Series: The Marvels of Cells & DNA
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Hi, I'm Michael Maidaa and this is water and solute movement through cell membrane. A cell membrane is semi-permeable, which means only some molecules can possibly diffuse through it. So, for example here we have a cell membrane. Some small molecules such as gases and water can simply make their way through without any help. This is called passive diffusion. And requires no energy. On the other hand, we have some larger molecules such as proteins and complex sugars that need energy to make their way in. They can't simply diffuse through. So, for this example, we have our cell membrane, but in some parts of the cell membranes, we'll have channels or pores, like this, which allows for the larger molecules to make their way through. So, for example we have a protein; it will go through the channel and make its way through the cell membrane. However, in this process we need energy in the form of ATP. So, unlike simple diffusion, active transport for large molecules require energy in the form of ATP. I'm Michael Maidaa and this has been water and solute movement through the cell membrane.

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