Messenger RNA Is Coded From What Portion of a DNA Molecule?

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Messenger RNA, or MRNA for short, is the result of transcription in which an RNA polymerase molecule shown here in orange binds to the promoter region of a gene. Find out about which portion of a DNA molecule that MRNA is coded from with help from an experienced chemistry professional in this free video clip.

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Hi, I'm Dan Weisenberger and this is, "Messenger RNA is coded from what portion of a DNA molecule?" Messenger RNA or MRNA for short is the result of transcription in which an RNA polymerase molecule shown here in orange binds to the promoter region of a gene. This is shown here and is upstream of the coding sequence of a gene, which is specified by these exons and separated by introns. So, what happens is is that the polymerase II machinery opens up a DNA helix shown in pink here and creates a transcription bubble, in which the machinery then reads the sequence of the bottom strand or the three prime to five prime strand and each of these teeth represents a specific unit of DNA code that is copied to the RNA, single-stranded RNA molecule shown in green and as this bubble opens, transcription occurs and it slides down and initially, and eventually transcribe the entire gene into an RNA molecule. And then, after splicing events, here for this gene, we get the mature RNA product which contains, in this example, exons one, two, three and four spliced together. This molecule will then goes onto be translated or coded into a protein molecule and then the protein will then be shipped to various parts of the cell in order to execute its function. I'm Dan Weisenberger and this is, "Messenger RNA is coded from what part of a DNA molecule?"

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