What Does Disaccharide Mean in Biology?

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Disaccharides are essentially two monosaccharides or two sugar molecules that are covalently linked together in a decondensation reaction. Find out more about disaccharide in biology with help from an experienced biology professional in this free video clip.

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Hi, I'm Dan Weisenberger, and today I'd like to talk about, "What does disaccharide mean in biology?" Disaccharides are essentially two monosaccharides or two sugar molecules that are covalently linked together in a decondensation reaction in which after the two combine a water molecule is released. If we look here at these two example disaccharides here we see that essentially we have a galactose sugar here and a glucose sugar here that are joined via the glycosidic bond and interestingly, depending on the types of monosaccharides or the types of sugar monomers as they are called, we get different disaccharides which have different functions in the cell and these disaccharides then serve as building blocks for larger polysaccharides that serve as glycoproteins or additional functions within the cell and also here we have lactose which is the disaccharides of galactose and glucose, however, if we add glucose and fructose together we get sucrose. And the combinations of disaccharides in the cell are also exponentially related to the stereo chemistry of each of these individual sugar molecules with diasteromers and enantiomers comprising different sugar monomers and subsequently unique disaccharides and unique polysaccharides. I'm Dan Weisenberger and this is, "What does disaccharide mean in biology?"

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