DIY Crochet Collar Blouse

Save
 
 
DIY Crochet Collar Blouse
Marisa Lynch

Inspired by this season’s fashionable Peter Pan collars and crocheted garments, Marisa Lynch, founder of "New Dress A Day," took thrift shop savvy to make a trendy blouse for just a few dollars, and she shared her advice with us.

“This piece is great because it’s something nobody else will have,” said Lynch. “Since you are using something thrifted, the fabric is unique and one-of-a-kind.”

Lynch added, “Plus, it's something easy that anyone can do, and it's totally budget-friendly. You can make these for you and all the gals and spend less than what you would to fill up your gas tank!”

Find a Thrifty Frock
Marisa Lynch

Find a Thrifty Frock

Don’t pass over that muumuu or large shift dress at your local thrift store. This budget-friendly, oversized find will be the perfect start to your on trend, Peter Pan collar blouse.

A tip from Lynch as you dig through muumuus: “Keep in mind using something with a basic scoop or crew neck will work best for this piece.”

Chop Chop
Marisa Lynch

Chop Chop

It’s time to take scissors to the frock. Decide on the length you want your new top, then cut about an inch below that, so you'll leave room to fold the fabric for the new hemline.

Sew or Glue the Hemline
Marisa Lynch

Sew or Glue the Hemline

After trimming the excess fabric, it’s time to make the hemline. You can go the traditional route and pin the hemline in place, then sew it with a machine. Or, you can get creative.

“If you don’t have a sewing machine,” said Lynch, “hand sewing, stitch witchery or leaving the edges raw are also options.”

Required Materials
Marisa Lynch

Required Materials

Now it’s time to really take your drab dress, to chic blouse. You’ll need three things all found at your local craft store: a doily, fabric paint to match your top and a paint brush. The doily will become your new neck detail.

The doily pictured has a 10-inch diameter. Play with different sizes to find the one that best suits your vintage find.

Pack on the Layers
Marisa Lynch

Pack on the Layers

When painting the doily, be sure to use several coats of paint, allowing the paint to dry between coats.

“The yarn is comprised of lots of strings,” said Lynch. “You don't want white peeking through your blue, green or red paint paint.”

Tidy Alternatives
Marisa Lynch

Tidy Alternatives

Paint has a tendency to splatter and get all over. If you prefer a tidier work space, there are alternatives to paint.

“Dye or fabric markers also work great to change the shade of the doily if you don't want to get your fingers messy,” said Lynch. When painting, place a protective sheet under your doily to protect your workspace from paint stains.

Create a Space for Your Neck
Marisa Lynch

Create a Space for Your Neck

Now you have a painted doily that you need to make into a Peter Pan collar. What to do? Reach for your trusty scissors, snip a slit and trim out the center leaving about a 2-inch trim of doily to use.

Pin It Down
Marisa Lynch

Pin It Down

After the paint dries, pin the doily trim to the collar. A key to making a clean neckline according to Lynch, is to fold under about a 1/4-inch of doily on the inside and then pin it in place.

A Touch of Pan
Marisa Lynch

A Touch of Pan

Now that the collar is pinned in place, let the sewing machine get to work. A tip from Lynch, be sure to match your thread to the color you painted the doily.

New Day, New Top
Marisa Lynch

New Day, New Top

Voila! For just a few dollars, and a little creativity, you have a great new top to give as a gift to a friend (or keep for yourself).

Related Searches

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!