10 French Foods To Globalize Your Kitchen

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10 French Foods To Globalize Your Kitchen
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It's no secret -- and no surprise -- that the French are known for their expertise in the kitchen. From cassoulet, onion soup and quiche Lorraine to ratatouille, beef bourguignon and fondue, the cuisine of France makes just about everyone's mouth water. Having a freshly made crepe served up in a cafe on the Boulevard Saint-Germain on Paris' Left Bank might be your preference, but you can bring that feeling home to your own kitchen with some of France's very own specialty dishes. Bon appetit!

Baguette
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Baguette

The baguette, literally translated, is the bread of life for the French. Best eaten on the day they are baked, baguettes accompany virtually every meal, from wine and cheese to the most formal of sit-down dinners. Even if you aren’t the next Julia Child, pick up a fresh baguette at your local bakery or supermarket to accompany your next meal.

Onion Soup
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Onion Soup

French onion soup is one of the few foods with “French” in the name that is, in fact, French. Easy to make and a meal in itself, it nourishes both body and soul when the weather cools off.

Quiche
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Quiche

It looks like a pie, but it isn't for dessert. It contains eggs, but it isn't an omelet. This paradox is the quiche, the dinner pie that knows no boundaries. Simple to make with a pie shell, eggs and other ingredients of your choice- such as ham, cheese, onions and mushrooms- the quiche gives weekend brunch a classy aura.

Fondue
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Fondue

Back in the 1970s, fondue enjoyed the status of a fad in the United States, and today it's making an encore. All it takes to do the due is a fondue pot, some oil, melted cheese or chocolate and various goodies to dip. Fondue is a party dish that makes no bones about gathering everyone around the food, so use your fondue as an excuse to invite everyone over.

Cassoulet
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Cassoulet

Cassoulet, which means casserole, covers a wide range when it comes to ingredients; it is mostly up to the chef. Cassoulet commonly contains beans, carrots, onions, tomatoes and seasonings, with duck often being the main meat.

Ratatouille
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Ratatouille

This French concoction from Provence makes a tasty addition to Thanksgiving dinner, and every dinner afterwards. It's made of such harvest vegetables as tomatoes, peppers, mushrooms, eggplant and onions all cooked up in olive oil and garlic. Take the advice of little Remy from Ratatouille and indulge in the classic vegetable dish.

Croissants
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Croissants

If you find yourself at a Paris hotel, the breakfast you'll most likely get will be juice, coffee and croissants -- maybe even chocolate croissants (yum!). Luckily for those of us that aren’t jetsetters, many American bakeries serve fresh croissants daily. It's a sweet way to start the day no matter where you are.

Salade Nicoise
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Salade Nicoise

Salade Nicoise carries the name of the place where it was born: Nice, on the French Riviera. Made of fresh tomatoes, potatoes, olives, green beans, tuna, mixed greens and eggs, it's a trademark dish of the region, and it's perfect as a light. healthy lunch.

Crepes
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Crepes

No matter the time of day, the crepe, otherwise known as a thin pancake, is one of the most customizable French foods out there. For lunch, indulge in a savory crepe filled with ham and cheese, and top off your dinner with a sweet chocolate and banana crepe. Crepes are no more than flour, sugar, eggs, milk, and butter, so there’s no reason why you shouldn’t be whipping up this French specialty in your kitchen as we speak!

Cheese Plate
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Cheese Plate

If you’re looking for a simple yet satisfying appetizer for your next sophisticated dinner party, look no further than the cheese plate. In France, cheese plates are both an appetizer and a dessert, so it is perfectly appropriate to serve your cheeses as a finger food before dinner or as a palate cleanser to finish the evening. Try to offer your guests a variety of cheeses- mix up the cow’s milk cheeses with the goat’s, and don’t forget a blue cheese for those who enjoy the sharper taste. Some French favorites include Camembert, Roquefort, Boursin, Reblochon, and Munster. Pair your cheese plate with a French red wine for that authentic Parisian taste.

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