Varieties of Camellia Sasanqua

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The "Camellia sasanqua" was brought to North America in the 1800s, but is native to Japan and China, where its beauty has been prized for centuries. In fact, Camellia sasanqua has become so popular that these plants have been cultivated in many different forms. Tolerant to many soil types and more tolerant to sun exposure than the "Camellia japonica," the Camellia sasanqua is a versatile plant that can be grown as a ground cover, shrub, or tree.

Camellia "Bonanza"

  • "Bonanza" is a special type of Camellia sasanqua because it was bred to be a dwarf. Reaching a height of only four to six feet, the bonanza has all the attributes of the larger Camellia sasanqua varieties. Prune hard and maintain the bonanza at regular intervals, and you will have a ground cover reaching about one to two feet tall. Light pruning will ensure a beautiful flowering shrub reaching a height of five to six feet, depending on the tree and how it is pruned. Place several bonanzas together to form a colorful hedge.

Camellia "Stephanie Golden"

  • Reminiscent of old antique roses in both scent and form, "stephanie golden" is a rare modern hybrid. While most camellias do not carry a sweet scent, "stephanie golden" exudes a light, rose-like fragrance. Semi-double white blooms deeply laced with dark, pink edging are set off by a yellow center. At maturity, this camellia will grow six to eight feet in height, and maintains a slightly smaller spread than other Camellia sasanquas.

Moon and Flowers

  • "Moon and Flowers" or "setsugekka" is a Camellia sasanqua prized for its profusion of semi-double white blooms starting in October and continuing well into January. With an upright growth habit, this cultivar can be easily trained to climb a wall or trellis. Prune on a regular basis, and moon and flowers will become a small attractive informal hedge. Allow it to grow to its full mature height of ten to twelve feet, and it can be pruned into a tree.

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  • Photo Credit Camélia image by Dominique LUZY from Fotolia.com
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