Medical Coding Certification Requirements in Texas

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Medical insurance billers and coders in Texas who earn certification in their chosen field find more employment opportunities at higher salaries than coders with no certification credentials. Throughout the Lone Star State, government agencies, hospitals, clinics and physicians recognize that hiring a certified coder will result in timely payments and an enormous reduction of rejected insurance claims. Exams are offered all year in many cities including Dallas, Temple, Houston and Fort Worth. Exam times and locations are listed on the American Academy of Professional Coders website at aapc.com. Early registration is encouraged due to limited seating.

Certified Professional Coder

  • Applicants interested in the Certified Professional Coder (CPC) credential are required to pass an exam that will demonstrate their working knowledge of anatomy, physiology, medical terminology, diagnoses and procedures typically performed in Texas physician's office settings. It tests their understanding of the state's coding rules and regulations, knowledge of how to apply the correct code to each diagnosis/procedure and to effectively dispute claim denials. As of July 2010, candidates must submit an application and pay a $300 fee four weeks prior to the exam date.

Certified Professional Coder-Hospital

  • Candidates for the Certified Professional Coder-Hospital (CPC-H) credential must take an exam that measures the knowledge required to properly code complex procedures and diagnoses, including anesthesia, surgical services and pathology in Texas hospitals and clinical outpatient settings. The exam tests the candidate's knowledge of anatomy, physiology, medical terminology and ability to integrate changes in coding and reimbursement rules. As of July 2010, candidates must submit an application and a $300 fee four weeks prior to the exam date.

Certified Professional Coder-Payer

  • Individuals interested in the Certified Professional Code--Payer (CPC-P) certification must demonstrate their knowledge of coding guidelines and reimbursement regulations from the payer’s perspective. The exam is geared towards individuals desiring to work as auditors, claims reviewers or in utilization management at Texas hospitals, clinics or physician offices. As of July 2010, candidates must submit an application and a $300 fee four weeks prior to the exam date.

Certified Interventional Radiology Cardiovascular Coder

  • Radiology coders interested in the Certified Interventional Radiology Cardiovascular Coder (CIRCC) credential are in extremely high demand and are paid the highest salary of the coding profession, according to a 2009 survey conducted by the American Academy of Professional Coders. As of July 2010, interested candidates are required to submit an application and a $400 fee four weeks prior to the exam date.

Certified Professional Medical Auditor

  • Coding auditors interested in earning the Certified Professional Medical Auditor (CPMA) credential must demonstrate an expertise in Texas coding and regulatory issues. The exam measures an understanding of law and concepts of coding and medical reimbursement rules. As of July 2010, applicants are required to submit an application and a $300 fee four weeks prior to the exam date.

Specialty Medical Coding Certification

  • Experienced coders working in specialty offices may opt to obtain a specialty medical coding certification that reflects expertise in their specialty. The 19 specialty certifications include cardiology (CCC), dermatology (CPCD), family practice (CFPC), emergency department (CEDC), surgery (CGSC) and urology (CUC). The exams test specialty-specific coding issues with an operative/patient-note-based format. As of July 2010, applicants must submit an application and a $245 fee four weeks prior to the exam date.

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