Canadian Overtime Labor Laws

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Employees in Canada are governed by either provincial or federal labor legislation, depending on the industry. The provincial and federal governments have labor legislation regarding overtime; it's important that both employees and employers are aware of the relevant legislation to ensure that workers are compensated fairly for all hours worked.

British Columbia

  • According to the government of British Columbia, employees who work more than eight hours a day are entitled to time-and-a-half. After working 12 hours, employees are entitled to double time. Employees who work more than 40 hours in a week--even if they never work more than eight hours in a day--are entitled to time-and-a-half. In British Columbia, employers can't allow or require an employee to work an excessive amount of hours or hours that may endanger the health or welfare of the employee.

Alberta

  • According to the government of Alberta, employees who work more than eight hours a day or 44 hours a week are entitled to time-and-a-half. However, due to the special demands of many of Alberta's industries, including mining and ranching, many employees and industries are either exempt from these overtime regulations or are subject to different ones. Please visit the government of Alberta's website, linked to in the resource section, for a detailed exception listing.

Saskatchewan

  • According to the government of Saskatchewan, employees who work more than eight hours a day or 40 hours a week are entitled to time-and-a-half. Employees have the right to decline working more than 44 hours a week, unless there is a workplace emergency.

Manitoba

  • According to the government of Manitoba, employees who work more than eight hours a day or 40 hours a week are entitled to time-and-a-half. In Manitoba, employees must have their employer's consent before working overtime; and working overtime is always voluntary, except in the case of a workplace emergency.

Ontario

  • According to the government of Ontario, there must be a written agreement in place between the employee and employer if an employee is going to work more than 48 hours in a week. This agreement must be submitted to the Ministry of Labour for approval. The employee is entitled to time-and-a-half for all hours worked over 44 hours a week.

Quebec

  • According to the government of Quebec, an employee who works more than 40 hours a week is entitled to time-and-a-half. An employee may refuse overtime if he or she is asked to work more than four hours over the normal shift, or more than 14 hours in a 24-hour period, whichever is shorter. The employee may also refuse overtime work if asked to work more than 50 hours in a given week (except in the case of staggered hours of work). Workers in remote areas--specifically the James Bay region--can refuse more than 60 hours in a given week. Employees cannot refuse work if the refusal endangers the life, health or safety of workers or the public, risks damage or destruction of property, or violates the employee's professional code of ethics.

Newfoundland and Labrador

Nova Scotia

  • According to the government of Nova Scotia, employees who work more than 48 hours in a week are entitled to time-and-a-half for all hours worked over 48 hours. Due to the special nature of many of the province's industries, many specific employees and industries are exempt,or follow adjusted legislation. Please visit the government of Nova Scotia's website, linked to in the resource section, for a detailed listing.

Prince Edward Island

  • According to the Government of Prince Edward Island, employees who work more than 48 hours in a week are entitled to time-and-a-half for all hours worked over 48 hours.

Federally Regulated Employees

  • Federally regulated employees include those who work for the Federal Civil Service, as well as those employed in several other specialized industries such as transportation. To find out if you work in a federally regulated industry, visit the government of Canada's website, linked to in the resource section. According to the government of Canada, federally regulated employees employees who work more than eight hours in a day or 40 hours in a week are entitled to time-and-a-half; however, some employees within federally regulated industries, such as doctors, managers, dentists and architects are exempt from this legislation. For specific information on these groups, please visit the government of Canada's website, linked to in the resource section.

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