Careers With an Associate's Degree in Biology

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An associate's degree in biology can lead to a number of entry-level jobs in the sciences. Many who earn associate's degrees in biology then transfer to a four-year program at a university; however, an associate's degree can give you the flexibility to work in a related field and see if that is what you want to pursue without spending as much time and money.

An associates degree in biology may lead to many entry-level jobs.
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One of the main career fields for those with associate degrees in biology is as a laboratory technician. Lab techs work in hospital, clinic and medical research labs. An average yearly salary for a tech is about $35,000, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. A particular type of lab tech is the histologic tech. These workers prepare blood and tissue samples for microscopic examination by a pathologist. These techs may earn between $13-20 an hour.

A laboratory technician.
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Research assistants at medical research labs or at universities can earn varying amounts according to facility and the responsibilities. Environmental technicians are a type of research assistants who work for recycling or waste management companies, manufacturing companies or utility companies. They help companies ensure they are in compliance with environmental regulations and help clean up environmental problems. This career can earn in the range of $40,000 a year.

A research assistant.
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Medical assistants work at physician's offices or clinics, depending on state requirements. Other possible fields for someone with an associate's degree in biology include veterinary technicians, state or national park worker, pest control specialists, or plant science technician.

Work as a medical assistant may be possible.
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