What Were Popular Hair Colors in the 60s?

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The 1960s were a decade of change, and hairstyles were no exception. From beehives to bright eccentric headbands, the ’60s marked new and exciting hairstyles for everyone. This was also the start of hair coloring, from red to bleach blonde to black, everyone wanted to make an impression with their fashion and through their hairstyles.

Auburn

Mia Farrow started the trend of auburn hair color which quickly became a desired color for in girls of all ages. Auburn is a mix of red and brown and many teen girls and young women flocked to the hairstylists to try the new color. Other famous people that helped the red hair trend grow were Carol Burnett and Lucille Ball.

Platinum Blonde

The platinum blonde color became more and more popular in the ’60s as well. It's hard to think of a blonde in the ’60s without thinking of Marilyn Monroe. She was the classic story of the girl next door turned to sex symbol.Born a natural red head, she went platinum blonde and was the reason why thousands of other girls also went platinum blonde.

Jet Black

Just like blondes going blonder, people with black hair wanted it to be jet black. The smooth look of the jet black hair was very popular for thousands of women and men alike. Women began cutting their hair short like boys and dying their hair jet black then adding a red or blonde highlight.

Highlights

With hair coloring also came highlighting in the ’60s. Highlighting in the early days consisted of a cap with holes in it. The cap would be put on the head and hair pulled through the holes with a needle. Once the hair was pulled through the cap, the stylist would then frost the portions of hair sticking out of the cap. Aubrey Hepburn made highlighting very popular after she starred in "Breakfast at Tiffany's." Red and blonde highlights were the most popular back then.

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