How Much Does a Service Coordinator Make?

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Service coordinators, also known as meeting planners, meeting coordinators, event planners and event coordinators, put together events for the general public and businesses. Their job is to ensure that the event host has all he needs for the event and that the event proceeds as the host desires. People in this industry average about $50,000 a year, depending on factors such as experience, employer and location.

Typical Pay

  • On average, service coordinators made $48,060 as of 2009, says the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This is about $23.11 when viewed in hourly pay. However, the pay range for event coordinators is considerable. Those in the 10th percentile made $27,550 in 2009, while those in the 90th percentile made $75,160. This represents a potential difference of over $47,600.

Best- and Worst-Paying Regions

  • The District of Columbia topped the Bureau of Labor Statistic's list of states and territories for meeting and convention planners in 2009 with an average salary of $55,170. Close behind were Connecticut and New York, which had compensation of $55,020 and $54,760, respectively. Massachusetts and Maryland followed with pay of $53,470 and $53,200, respectively. The five lowest-paying regions in 2009 included Montana, which had pay of $35,820. Next was Arkansas at $35,750. Oklahoma and South Dakota followed with respective compensation of $34,100 and $31,980. The lowest salaries for service coordinators were in South Carolina -- pay in this state was $28,680.

Sector

  • The Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that, in 2009, meeting and event planners did the best financially in sectors related to technology, finance and medicine. The software publishing sector led pay with rates of $65,530 per year. In aerospace parts and manufacturing, pay was $62,350. The pharmaceutical and medicine manufacturing industry paid an average of $60,790. The nondepository credit intermediation (lending) sector paid $60,540, while wireless communications carriers paid $59,260.

Considerations

  • Although some service coordinators hold salaried positions, putting together events for companies on a regular basis, others own their own businesses and freelance. If an event coordinator does this, then the amount she earns depends on how many services or events she can put together. Additionally, the complexity of the event sometimes influences what a coordinator charges. Experienced coordinators, whether salaried or non-salaried, may make more than less-experienced coordinators, as experienced coordinators often have larger networks of people who can help out and have learned ways of making projects more time-efficient. Lastly, some meeting and convention planners opt to become certified. Certified planners may receive training that further enables the coordinator to be more efficient. Certification also lends more professionalism, which helps attract clients.

References

  • Photo Credit Maria Teijeiro/Digital Vision/Getty Images
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