Salary of a Nanny in NYC

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Nannies may provide full-time or part-time services, may be live-in or live-out employees and may provide any number of tasks. Childcare is the primary responsibility of a nanny, but additional duties may include cleaning, shopping or cooking. Some nannies are au pairs, which is a technical term describing foreign-born nannies authorized to work by the U.S. Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Nannies are also called doulas or governesses.

Salary Factors

  • Like any profession, education and experience play roles in nannies' salaries. Some nannies are highly educated, while others receive formal nanny training through approved nanny course work --- from one- or two-day classes to curricula taking a year or more to complete. Other factors affecting salaries are whether nannies are live-in or live-out employees; how many children are involved; duties required; part-time versus full-time status; and additional benefits provided by the employer, such as meals, health insurance and paid time off. Knowing CPR is also a factor.

Live-In Nanny Salary

  • According to a 2008 survey of New York City-area nannies conducted by 4 Nanny Taxes, the gross hourly wage for a full-time, live-in nanny in the New York City area was $15.95, as reported by nannies themselves. Families employing nannies reported a wage of $12.67 an hour. Wages paid with no tax considerations were $12.60 as reported by nannies and $9.25 as reported by families. For part-time live-in nannies, the nanny-reported gross wage was $17.08 an hour and the family-reported hourly rate was $15.20. The non-taxed cash wages were $17.14 as reported by nannies and $13.29 according to families. One percent of nannies surveyed cared for five or more children, 3.8 percent cared for four kids, 12.9 percent cared for three children, 47.8 percent cared for two kids and 34.4 percent cared for one child. The majority also prepared children's meals, did children's laundry, performed household chores and provided kids' transportation.

Live-Out Nanny Salary

  • Live-out nannies, or come-and-go nannies, accounted for nearly four out of five nannies in the 4 Nanny Taxes survey. Gross pay for full-time, live-out nannies was $16.79 an hour as reported by nannies and $15.20 as reported by families. Novices earned $15 and $14 an hour, respectively, and nannies with two to five years experience earned $14.50 and $14.83, respectively. Those with five years or more on the job made $17.70 according to nannies and $15.86 as reported by employers. Cash wages with no tax considerations were $15.47 and $13.63, respectively, with novices earning $12 an hour as reported by nannies and $13.50 as reported by families. Nannies with two to five years experience made $12.75 and $14 an hour, respectively, and veteran nannies with more than five years experience earned $16.90 and $13.20 an hour, respectively. Part-time, live-out nannies made gross wages of $17.08 an hour as reported by nannies and $15.20 according to employers.

Salary Comparisons

  • New York City nannies, at $16.61 an hour, were among the highest paid nannies in the U.S., according to a 2010 International Nanny Association survey. Among cities with higher average hourly wages were Seattle at $20.78, San Francisco at $20.56, San Jose at $19 and Los Angeles at $17.87.

Other Considerations

  • Nanny salaries are subject to the U.S. Fair Labor Standards Act. Hourly wages are to be paid in accordance with 40-hour workweeks, although most nannies work on fixed weekly or monthly pay arrangements. Live-out nannies are to be compensated at time and a half pay rates for work preformed beyond 40 hours per week. Work agreements should be expressly stipulated in written agreements.

References

  • Photo Credit SW Productions/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images
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