Salary of an Electrical & Instrumentation Technician

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Electrical engineering technicians take part in the full process of creating communications, medical and navigational instruments, from designing to testing and manufacturing. The salary of an electrical and instrumentation technician varies based on the type of devices his employer produces, as well as his level of experience and the location in which he lives.

Salary

  • The average salary of an electrical and instrumentation technician in the United States was $55,410 as of May 2009, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The salary scale began at less than $33,380 for those in the 10th percentile and less than $42,610 for those in the 25th percentile. The median salary was $54,820, with electrical and instrumentation technician in the 75th percentile earning over $65,470 annually and those in the 90th percentile earning over $79,660.

Employer

  • The largest industry for electrical and instrumentation technicians as of 2009 was architectural, engineering and related services, which offered an average salary of $54,670, according to the bureau. Those working in the industry of semiconductor and other electronic component manufacturing earned an average of $50,330 a year, and those in navigational, measuring, electro-medical and control instruments manufacturing earned an average of $56,300. Electrical and instrumentation technicians working for the postal service earned an average salary of $60,500 annually.

Location

  • The state with the highest concentration of electrical and instrumentation technicians was Massachusetts as of 2009, where the bureau reports techs earned an average income of $57,700. New Mexico had the second highest concentration and offered an average salary of $56,970. The highest paying state for electrical and instrumentation technicians was Alaska with a salary average of $77,040, while the District of Columbia ranked second with a salary average of $73,500.

Advancement

  • Larger and more complex projects usually mean higher wages for electrical and instrumentation technicians, and in some cases advancement into a supervisory role may be an opportunity. Electrical and instrumentation technicians can also find higher than average wages in more competitive industries; those working in oil and gas extraction earned an average of $71,230 as of 2009, while the bureau reports those working for the federal executive branch earned an average of $75,740.

References

  • Photo Credit Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images
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