IT Inventory Checklists

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Information technology, or IT, departments are essential to many different types of businesses. While much of their work takes place behind closed doors, IT professionals manage computer systems and keep networks up and running. To do this an IT department needs a host of electronic equipment at its disposal. When your business takes office inventory, a checklist can help ensure that your IT department has the proper equipment in place and that all of it is secure.

Computers

  • Much of an IT department's inventory is likely to be composed of computers. This includes desktop computers where IT staff can track clients, maintain databases, manage staff and access the Internet to search for technical fixes and communicate with colleagues. The checklist should also include laptop computers and mobile devices (such as tablets, personal digital assistants and smartphones) that IT staff take into the field to troubleshoot problems and test networks.

Software

  • Even though it may not have a physical presence, an IT department's software likely represents a considerable expense on the part of the business. Missing, outdated or corrupted programs may not be effective tools for managing a company's computer and networking needs. Computer operating systems offer quick system profiles that reveal which programs are installed on each computer during an inventory.

Phones

  • If your IT department offers phone support, include its phone equipment in a basic inventory. Your checklist should include basic items such as handsets, answering machines and headsets, as well as system-wide equipment including routers and line splitters. Your IT department may also need business cell phones for communicating while outside the office. If the phone system is complex, user manuals for new IT staff members should also be on your inventory checklist.

General Supplies

  • The remainder of an IT department's inventory consists of miscellaneous supplies that depend on the scope and needs of your business's networks and computers. A workplace with a wireless network means that the IT department needs access to wireless routers, wireless cards for users' computers and installation CDs or drives to load network software on new computers. A wired network requires cables, modems and wired routers.

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