Pros & Cons About Computer Keyboards


The computer keyboard has existed since the 1970s, attached to computer mainframes. Since the advent of the personal computer in the 1980s, it has been the ubiquitous human interface with a computer, preceding the mouse by at least a decade. Newer computing devices, which are getting smaller and more portable, often do not have traditional "hardware" keyboards.

Speed and Accuracy

  • While there is somewhat of a learning curve to operating a computer keyboard, using one is so commonplace that its benefits become quickly apparent. Many tasks on a computer require text input, which is clumsy and slow without a keyboard. Word processing would be an arduous chore without any kind of keyboard. Most tasks for the average user, e-mail and Internet-related use, are largely dependent on this peripheral.


  • With mobile devices, especially laptops, the keyboard can be cumbersome while being smaller and more cramped than desktop keyboards. With e-readers, attached keyboards increase the size of the device by as much as a third, in the case of Amazon's Kindle. Many new devices use "software" keyboards, which appear on the touchscreen. You may use Bluetooth keyboards for these devices, chiefly tablets, but this defeats the purpose somewhat.


  • Keyboards are supported by every personal computer in order to provide a basic way to interface with any computer. Recently, this expanded to include BIOS support for USB keyboards, now the standard for human interface devices on computers. This is especially useful for troubleshooting devices through command line interfaces.


  • While a basic USB keyboard isn't very expensive, manufacturers of these peripherals are geared toward offering higher-end keyboards designed for compact and portable use. Usually these are wireless, paired by USB adapter or Bluetooth. Sometimes businesses sell these on the basis of better construction, as in the case of mechanical keyboards.


  • Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images
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