Great Winter Flowering Plants for Southern California

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Southern California’s temperate climate is just right for many wintering bloom plants. There are many native to the region, but others adapted to the California climate. Whether you’re looking for annuals or perennials, shrubs or succulents, there’s a host from which to choose. You can replant yearly, or choose longer-lived specimens giving your garden winter color year after year.

Aloe arborescens

  • Aloes are succulents storing water in their leaves. This makes them drought tolerant and low maintenance. They can become large, forming a mass of shrubs up to 10 feet high and wide. Their clusters of scarlet flowers brighten up your garden during the winter months.

Azaleas

  • These plants bloom in winter and spring in Southern California and bring color to the garden. They need protection from wind, and prefer indirect sunlight and too much direct sunlight can harm them.

Baja Fairy Duster

  • The Baja Fairy Duster (Calliandra californica) is native to California and Mexico. This evergreen shrub grows 5 feet tall and about the same wide. It blooms all year-round, producing spiky balls of red or pink, in various shades.

Camellia

  • Cyclamen like it cool, but not cold. They do well in the Southern California climate and produce flowers in pink, red, salmon, white, rose and purple, as well as some striped and bicolored varieties.

Cyclamen

  • Pansies thrive in the temperate winters of Southern California and are easy to grow. They come in a wide variety of colors and patterns. They prefer soil that is rich and well drained and don’t like being planted too deeply.

Pansy

  • Pansies thrive in the temperate winters of Southern California and are easy to grow. They come in a wide variety of colors and patterns. They prefer soil that is rich and well drained and don’t like being planted too deeply.

Poinsettia

Snapdragon

  • Snapdragons bloom in late winter and early spring and come in pink, red and yellow with many variations in shade and color combination. They’re easy to grow but stop flower if it gets too hot. Partial shade is best for them in sunny climates.

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