Grants for Children's After School Programs

Save

After-school programs for children provide a safe environment for students to learn new skills and crafts. Federal grant funding is available for local community groups, nonprofit agencies and schools to assist with the cost of running activities after regular school hours, and the money does not have to be repaid.

Children, Youth and Families At Risk Initiative (CYFAR)

CYFAR provides eligible cooperative extensions of state universities funding for after-school programs targeted at low-income youth up to age 19, although parents are urged to take advantage of the services. The program is overseen by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, but the grant money may be used for other categories, such as computer training and art programs.

Education for Homeless Children and Youth

The Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program issues grant funding for after-school programs and activities that assist homeless children. The money is issued by the U.S. Department of Education to eligible state education departments for distribution among qualifying schools. The grant money must be used for activities and educational aids for homeless students, but the funds can be applied toward educating teaching professionals on the plight of homelessness to improve relations with such children.

National School Lunch Program: Afterschool Snacks

A school district that is part of the National School Lunch Program, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's reduced or free-lunch program for low-income students, can apply for the Afterschool Snacks Grant through the same department. The grant money is for the purchase of healthy snack food given to students during structured after-school activities. The after-school program must be clearly defined, under supervision of adults and have an educational or enrichment purpose.

Title I Supplemental Services

Title I Supplemental Services funding is for schools that have been rated as "failing" by the supervising state education department. The U.S. Department of Education gives the money to the schools for the development of after-school programs, tutoring and summer-education opportunities to help the school improve its overall rating and improve the educational experience and success of the attending students.

Related Searches

References

Promoted By Zergnet

Comments

Related Searches

Check It Out

4 Credit Myths That Are Absolutely False

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!