Regression in Children After Potty Training

Potty training regression or toilet-training regression, occurs when your child suffers from some form of emotional disturbance. You may have recently taught your child how to potty train, only to have him develop accidents a few weeks later. Potty training regression is common in toddlers, especially when your child tries to adjust to the potty. It helps to reassure your child that he'll get back on track when he's ready, to avoid further accidents.

  1. Change in Routine

    • A drastic change can make your toddler backtrack during potty training.
      A drastic change can make your toddler backtrack during potty training.

      The addition of a new child to your family may cause your toddler to regress, indicates Huggies. Your toddler may deliberately have an accident to gain attention. Toddlers starting a new day-care program or are going through the process of a move may feel confused by the change. Until your toddler can adjust, potty training will result in setbacks.

    Urinary Tract Infection

    • A medical condition may make your child refuse to use the potty.
      A medical condition may make your child refuse to use the potty.

      Children may lack the necessary skills to wipe during potty training, resulting in the introduction of bacteria into your child's urethra. As a result, a urinary tract infection can develop. Girls develop urinary tract infections as a result of having a shorter urethra, states Children's Hospital Boston. Your child may not control her bladder, resulting in accidents. It may also be painful to use the restroom, causing anxiety in your child.

    Encopresis

    • Your child may try to control his potty training.
      Your child may try to control his potty training.

      Encopresis develops when your child suffers from severe constipation, notes the Mayo Clinic. Children who refuse to have a bowel movement, do so out of fear or emotional stress. Your child may have suffered previously from a painful bowel movement, causing him to refuse to use the potty. Children potty trained too early, may also revert back to holding in their fecal waste.

    Embarrassment

    • Embarrassment and shame can make your child angry.
      Embarrassment and shame can make your child angry.

      Children that are punished or teased if they have an accident can regress. Children can understand that going potty is a natural process. However, when you punish your child for an accident, she may associate shame and embarrassment to using the potty. Your child may also become strong-willed as a result of criticism, refusing to use the potty.

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