What Fruits Are Mistaken for Veggies?


There are fruits people eat almost every day that they mistake for a vegetable. This thinking makes sense in a way, since the word vegetable is a culinary word and has no specific scientific definition. On the other hand, a fruit is defined as the fleshy, edible part of a plant covering the seeds. Fruits are also normally sweet when ripe and can be eaten in a raw state.


  • Tomatoes are commonly called vegetables but fit the definition of a fruit. Although not as sweet when compared to an apple, tomatoes still have a hint of sweetness. Tomatoes also "house" the seeds of the plant and comes directly from its flowers. It also fits the botanical definition of a fruit since it is a product of a flowering plant that comes from a specific part of its flower, which is usually a tissue from its ovaries.

Cucumber and Eggplant

  • Cucumber and eggplant are also fruits. Both fruits are the fleshy part of the plant that houses the seeds, and they have a hint of sweetness. They also come directly from the flowers of the plants. These fruits are often mistaken for vegetables because of the way they are used in cooking. Cucumbers are mostly eaten raw. Eggplant can be eaten this way too although it may not taste as good as when it's cooked.


  • Most people think peppers are vegetables because of the way these fruits are used in cooking. They can be eaten raw when they are ripe enough, although the taste may not be as welcoming as an apple or an orange. All types of peppers, like red bell peppers and green peppers, are fruits.

Squash and Pumpkins

  • Squash and pumpkin are thought to be vegetables because of the way they're cooked, but essentially they are fruits too. These fruits house seeds and they also have a sweet, tangy taste when they are ripe. They also come from the flowers of the plant, thus technically satisfying the definition of a fruit.


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