Kids Kitchen Slipcover

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A slipcover kitchen is ideal for small spaces or temporary play areas. You can store it in a drawer or small cabinet and set it up for playtime, quick as a wink. Make your own chair cover or start with a purchased version and just add the appliqué.

Kids Kitchen Slipcover
(Debbie Williams)

To make the slipcover kitchen, you'll need:

  • Tape measure
  • Off-white cotton twill or canvas for the base, 2 yards
  • Scissors
  • Straightedge
  • Rotary cutter and cutting mat
  • Water-soluble pen
  • Fabric for curtains, 1/2 yard
  • Fabric for side pockets and backsplash, 1/2 yard
  • Fabric scraps in colors suitable for the burners, knobs, oven door, kitchen window, etc.
  • Paper-backed fusible web
  • Sewing machine with size 80 needle
  • Iron
  • Hook-and-loop fastener (such as Velcro), 30 inches
  • Double-fold seam binding, 8 yards
  • 4 large buttons
Debbie Williams

Measure the following:

A: the height from the seat to the floor B: the width of the chair at the front C: the depth of the seat D: the width of the chair at the back E: the height from the seat to the top of the chair's back If you don't have a specific chair in mind, use standard measurements: seat to floor height, 18 inches; width, 19 inches; depth, 18 inches. Seat height to back-of-chair height ranges between 20 and 24 inches.

Debbie Williams

Cut the pieces for the stove top, chair front, chair sides and chair back, adding 5/8-inch seam allowances as necessary.

  • Stove Top: equal to the depth of the seat by the width of the chair.
  • Chair Front: equal to the width of the chair by the height of the chair seat.
  • Chair Sides (2): equal to the depth of the chair by the seat height of the chair.
  • Chair Back: equal to the height of the chair from the seat to the top of the back times two, plus the height of the chair seat. (This can be several pieces sewn together, if necessary.)
Debbie Williams

Most chair seats are not perfectly square, so you will probably need to create a taper from the width of the front of the chair to the width of the chair at the connection to the back. On the stove top piece, mark the four points of the chair seat on the fabric, fold in half and cut a straight line between the points.

Debbie Williams

Trace a small bowl or plate onto paper-backed fusible web to create four "burners." Iron the fusible web onto the back of the fabric you have chosen for the burners. When the fabric is cool, cut out the circles.

Debbie Williams

Peel the paper backing off of the fusible web and position the four circles on the stove top piece (tapered chair seat) so they look like burners. Use a hot iron to fuse them into place. Stitch around each burner, just covering the cut edges of the fabric.

Debbie Williams

Repeat the same process to create four smaller circles, using baby food jars or a biscuit cutter for the template. Position the smaller circles onto the top of the chair front piece so they look like four knobs on the front of a stove. Fuse them into place with a hot iron and then stitch around each of them. Sew a large button in the middle of each circle to complete the stove knobs.

Debbie Williams

Create an oven door by cutting a large rectangle from the chair cover fabric and a slightly smaller rectangle from black fabric for the oven window. Fuse and stitch the black "window" to the center of the oven "door." Sew seam binding around the outside edges of the door. Place the door on the chair front piece, centering it under the four knobs, and mark the location with a water-soluble pen.

Debbie Williams

Position strips of Velcro (the loop side) just inside the marked area of the oven door, along the sides. Add another strip across the center. Stitch all three strips in place. Stitch strips of Velcro (the hook side) to the back of the oven door, along the sides. Set the oven door in place on the chair front piece and stitch across the bottom of the door.

Debbie Williams

Lay the chair back piece over the chair back and decide on sizes for a backsplash and a window. Appliqué one piece of fabric to represent the backsplash, another to represent the outdoor view, and a third to represent a window frame.

Debbie Williams

For the curtains, cut three pieces:

  • Curtain Rod: 2 inches wide by the width of the window.
  • Side Panels (2): the height of the window by 15 to 20 inches wide.

Hem the side panels on three sides and run a gather stitch across the top. Gather each panel to fit across about one-third of the window.

Press a 1/2-inch seam along the length of one side of the curtain rod. With the right sides together, pin the gathered side panels to the opposite (non-folded) side of the curtain rod, leaving a gap in the center. Stitch together. Fold the curtain rod over the raw edges and stitch in place. Sew the curtain assembly over the window.

Debbie Williams

Cut pockets from the backsplash fabric and sew a strip of accent fabric along the top edge. Hem the edges of each pocket and stitch one pocket to each of the chair sides. Sew a few seams through the pockets to make narrow storage spaces for utensils.

Debbie Williams

Stitch one chair side to each side of the chair front. Sew double-fold seam binding around the sides and bottom of this assembly. Stitch this assembly to the stove top and set aside.

Sew seam binding around the sides and top edge of the chair back. Stitch the chair back to the stove top assembly.

Debbie Williams

Stitch closed a strip of seam binding and cut into eight 10-inch strips. Attach these ties at the bottom corners of the stove top and matching locations on the chair back. Add additional ties below the center point of the curtains and to the chair back at matching locations.

Debbie Williams

Make additional items out of felt or other appliqué to play with such as cakes, cookies, a turkey, or anything that you would place in an oven. Sew a strip of the hook side of Velcro to the back of each piece. Add play utensils to the side pockets and pots and pans on the stove top.

Debbie Williams

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