Easy Ways to Get Rid of Your Dog's Excess Energy

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If Rover is always bouncing off the walls -- and driving you crazy in the process -- don't despair. Excess energy is often a sign of boredom or lack of exercise, so finding a solution is a lot easier and faster than you might expect. Just a few small changes here and there can make a world of difference in your dog's energy level.

Get Him Tired

  • One of the reasons dogs are hyper is because of pent-up energy. Probably the easiest and fastest way to get rid of your dog's extra energy is to increase the amount of exercise he gets. If he's already walking three times a day, make the walks longer or add extra exercise, such as bursts of running or some Frisbee play in the park. Or try adding an extra walk or some ball play into Rover's daily routine.

Put Your Dog to Work

  • Some breeds are born ready to work -- those are the dogs who like to herd, hunt or solve problems. If you live in an apartment -- or if you work long hours -- your dog might simply be bored and acting out as a way to entertain himself. To control his energy levels, try giving your dog a job. Some working breeds, like spaniels and collies, do great in agility training, while others might enjoy carrying things, like a doggie backpack, when you go for a walk. Clever dogs might enjoy puzzles bought at the pet store, where they have to perform certain tasks to get a treat.

Try Alternative Therapy

  • Aromatherapy has been used for centuries to help people calm down and relieve stress -- and there's no reason why you shouldn't try it on your dog. Lavender in particular is great for high energy dogs. Try incorporating the oil into Rover's shampoo -- just a few drops into the bottle should help -- or add a few drops to his bed. Or light an oil diffuser to allow the aroma to spread throughout the house. Not all dogs respond to aromatherapy, but it might be worth a try.

Ignore the Behavior

  • Some dogs are highly energetic because it gets them results. For example, if Rover realizes that running like a mad dog around the house and jumping on the furniture gets him your attention, he'll continue doing it. One way to deal with that: ignore the behavior, recommends dog trainer Cesar Millan. Next time the hyper behavior starts, just walk away. No talking to Rover, no eye contact and definitively no taking him for a walk -- otherwise, he'll learn that his behavior gets results.

References

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