How to Fix a Sweet Taste in Stews

How to Fix a Sweet Taste in Stews thumbnail
Taste your stew during cooking to catch sweet mistakes early.

Hearty, savory stews are the perfect comfort food for cool weather or whenever you want a satisfying meal, but sometimes cooking mistakes occur. Accidentally tossing in sugar, instead of salt, or using sweet ingredients may leave you with a stew that has an unpleasant or unexpected flavor. You can correct these syrupy mistakes by adding a few ingredients to counteract the sweetness. With some patience and a little extra cooking time, you can serve a perfectly flavored dish regardless of a few errant ingredients.

Things You'll Need

  • 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • Wooden spoon
  • 2 tbsp butter or olive oil
  • Lemon wedges
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Instructions

    • 1

      Stir in 1 to 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar. The acidity of the vinegar will offset some of the sweetness. Continue to stir the stew on a low heat for one minute until the vinegar is well-blended.

    • 2

      Drizzle in 2 tablespoons of olive or butter. Fatty ingredients will cut the sweet flavor.

    • 3

      Ladle individual servings of stew into bowls. Squeeze a wedge of lemon over each bowl. The lemon's natural acidity will brighten the flavor and hide the sweetness.

Tips & Warnings

  • Add a few cups of beef broth to your stew if all else fails. This will help dilute sugary tastes.

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References

  • Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

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