How to Broil Steak in a Stove

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The broiler's flames char the surface of the meat.
The broiler's flames char the surface of the meat. (Image: Hemera Technologies/Photos.com/Getty Images)

If you have a broiler, you can still enjoy a flame-seared steak during cold winter seasons and inclement weather. However, broilers cook from above rather than below, which means their heat is less intense and they need more time to thoroughly cook a steak. Broiling also requires more cleaning than grilling and it cannot replicate the flavor of charcoal, but it offers home cooks a convenient alternative to gas grilling when a grill isn't available.

Let the steak come to room temperature by removing it from the refrigerator and resting it on the counter for 30 to 60 minutes. Remove moisture from the steak with a paper towel.

Turn on the stove's broiler. Adjust the rack inside the stove so it rests six inches below the flame. Allow the broiler to heat up for 15 to 20 minutes.

Season the steak with oil, salt and pepper. Add herbs and other spices if you wish.

Place the steak in a broiling pan or cast-iron skillet. Lay the steak 2 or 3 inches beneath the broiler's flames and close the stove. When preparing a steak that's 1-inch thick, Omaha Steaks recommends cooking the first side for 7 to 8 minutes for medium-rare to medium done-ness; Cook the first side for 11 minutes for well-done.

Flip the steak after the flames have seared the top side. Cook the other side 6 minutes for medium-rare or medium, or 9 minutes for well-done, states Omaha Steaks.

Remove the steak from the broiler, cover it with aluminum foil and let it rest for 10 minutes.

Slice the steak and serve.

Tips & Warnings

  • Shorten the cooking times for thinner steaks; lengthen them for thicker steaks.

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