How to Calculate Flow Rate From 4 Pipe With 60 PSI Pressure

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A pipe's thickness and the pressure drop across it determine its rate of flow of water. A thicker pipe allows more water through it, which means that a 4-inch pipe allows a higher flow than a 3-inch pipe. A higher pressure also allows more water through the pipe, which means that a pressure difference of 60 pounds per square inch (psi) forces a higher flow than a 30 psi flow.

  • Divide the pipe's thickness by 2 to find its radius: 4 ÷ 2 = 2 inches.

  • Multiply the radius by 0.0254 to convert it to meters: 2 --- 0.0254 = 0.0508 m.

  • Multiply the pressure drop by 6,895 to convert it to Pascals: 60 --- 6,895 = 413,700 Pa.

  • Raise the radius, measured in meters, to the power of 4: 0.0508 ^ 4 = 6.6597 --- 10^-6.

  • Multiply this answer by pi, which is approximately 3.142: (6.6597 --- 10^-6) --- 3.142 = 2.0925 --- 10^-5.

  • Multiply the result by the pipe's pressure drop, measured in pascals: (2.0925 --- 10^-5) ÷ 413,700 = 5.058 --- 10^-11.

  • Divide this answer by 0.01, which is the viscosity of water, measured in Poise: (5.058 --- 10^-11) ÷ 0.01 = 5.058 --- 10^-9.

  • Divide this answer by 8, a constant conversion factor: (5.058 --- 10^-9) ÷ 8 = 6.3225 --- 10^-10.

  • Divide the result by the pipe's length, measured in meters. For instance, if you're calculating the flow in a 5 m pipe: (6.3225 --- 10^-10) ÷ 5 = 1.2645 --- 10^-10. This is the flow rate through the pipe, measured in cubic meters per second.

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