How to Calculate Treasury Stock Transactions

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Your company can repurchase its own stock, which is called treasury stock.
Your company can repurchase its own stock, which is called treasury stock. (Image: Comstock/Comstock/Getty Images)

Stock that a company issues to investors and later buys back is called treasury stock. Your company can later resell its treasury stock for a higher or lower price, resulting in a profit or loss. But these profits and losses contribute only to a change in your company’s stockholders’ equity, and not your net income. Unlike stock your company may hold in another company, your treasury stock is not an asset and must be accounted for in an account called treasury stock. You can calculate the amounts of these treasury stock transactions and the effects they have on your accounts in your accounting records.

Stock Repurchase Cost

Determine the number of shares and the price per share at which your company repurchased its stock. For example, assume your company repurchased 500 shares of stock at $5 per share.

Multiply the number of shares by the price per share to calculate the repurchase cost. For example, multiply 500 by $5, which equals $2,500.

Increase your treasury stock account and reduce your cash account in your accounting records by the amount of the repurchase cost. For example, increase your treasury stock account by $2,500, and reduce your cash account balance by $2,500.

Reselling for a Profit

Multiply the number of shares of treasury stock you resold by the price per share at which you resold them. Then increase your cash account by that amount in your accounting records. For example, if you resold 250 shares for $6 per share, multiply 250 by $6, which equals $1,500. Then increase your cash account by $1,500.

Multiply the number of shares you resold by the price per share at which you initially repurchased them. Then reduce your treasury stock account by that amount in your accounting records. For example, if you initially repurchased the 250 shares for $5 per share, multiply 250 by $5, which equals $1,250. Then decrease your treasury stock account by $1,250.

Subtract the amount for which you initially repurchased the shares from the amount you received from reselling them to determine your profit. Then increase your paid-in-capital from treasury stock account by that amount. For example, subtract $1,250 from $1,500, which equals $250. Then increase your paid-in-capital account by $250.

Reselling for a Loss

Multiply the number of shares of treasury stock you resold by the price per share at which you resold them that is lower than the initial repurchase price. Then increase your cash account balance by that amount. For example, if you resold 250 shares for $4 per share, multiply 250 by $4, which equals $1,000. Then increase your cash account balance by $1,000.

Multiply the number of shares you resold by the price per share at which you initially repurchased them. Then decrease your treasury stock account balance by that amount in your accounting records. For example, if you initially repurchased the 250 shares for $5 per share, multiply 250 by $5, which equals $1,250. Then decrease your treasury stock account balance by $1,250.

Subtract the amount for which you resold the shares from the amount for which you originally repurchased them to determine your loss. Then decrease your paid-in-capital from treasury stock account by that amount. For example, subtract $1,000 from $1,250, which equals a $250 loss. Then decrease your paid-in-capital account by $250.

Tips & Warnings

  • If the loss in Step 3 of the last section is greater than the balance in your paid-in-capital from treasury stock account, decrease the account by the amount of its balance. Then reduce your retained earnings account by the remaining amount of the loss.

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